Atlas of Imagined Places: from Lilliput to Gotham City

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Atlas of Imagined Places: from Lilliput to Gotham City

Atlas of Imagined Places: from Lilliput to Gotham City

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In addition to the maps and the accompanying essays describing the twisty logic that the authors used to finally pin point where these famous locations from fiction are (most likely) located, the Atlas also includes an extensive index along with map coordinates so it is easy to find a particular someplace on the maps (although I think you’ll agree that a magnifying glass is essential equipment for reading these thousands of entries). The atlas is sumptuously illustrated by Mike Hall, whose glorious maps and illustrations of London have long beguiled us.

Atlas of Imagined Cities: Who Lives Where in TV, Books, Games and Movies. by Matt Brown, Rhys B. Davies and Mike Hall is out now from Batsford. From Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot to the superhero land of Wakanda, from Lilliput of Gulliver’s Travels to Springfield in The Simpsons, this is a wondrous atlas of imagined places around the world. Locations from film, tv, literature, myths, comics and video games are plotted in a series of beautiful vintage-looking maps. We did the research by trawling through the internet and looking for books. I would then compile a master spreadsheet and Matt would do rough sketch maps and put locations down on it." Special thanks to Tyler McChantelle who, as on previous maps, has provided many locations. Ditto Amanda Oliver, who continues to fill in blanks. Perhaps most surprising (to me, anyway, since it turns out that I grew up nearby) is the location for The Simpsons’ hometown, Springfield, the whereabouts of which the writers of the TV show are notoriously shy about pinning down. I had my suspicion confirmed that I did indeed grow up in The Hunger Games’ ruthless District One. As a lifelong dinosaur fan, I was excited that the mythical Isla Nublar, home of the ill-fated Jurassic Park, was also mapped. I also discovered a bounty of toys for any little girl or boy who wishes for a Christmas gift when I found the Isle of Mifsfit Toys. Another surprise for me was seeing that Winnie the Pooh’s home is next to where the Animal Farm revolution occurred.A stunning map collection of invented geography and topography drawn from the world’s imagination. Fascinating, beautiful and an essential book for any popular culture fan and map enthusiast. Explore the imagined places in Central America and the Caribbean in this extract from Atlas of Imagined Places, which was awarded Illustrated Travel Book of the Year in the Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards this week.

Nevertheless, this fascinating book is essential for any map enthusiast or devotee of popular culture. I am already eagerly awaiting the extra large pull-down classroom version of these maps so I can use them as blinds in my office.

Fictional London mapped

What happens when someone simply lets their imagination conjure up places to see that have never been seen? What about plants or animals never seen? What would your drawings of a mapping of these places, plants, and animals actually look like? The book includes interesting discoveries including George Orwell's Animal Farm being located right next to Winnie the Pooh's 100 Acre Wood. A map on this resolution, though, can only scratch the surface of fictional London. For that, you can always browse our map of the Unreal City, which contains hundreds of fictional places in the capital. Besides the city maps, artfully drawn by illustrator Mike Hall, the book also includes plenty of mini-essays exploring the fiction of the 14 cities. These explain how the authors sleuthed their locations. Often, it's obvious from the source material, but sometimes a bit of detective-work is needed to pinpoint a fictional home, business or event. Londonist editor-at-large Matt Brown, and co-author Rhys B Davies, have taken the concept to the entire planet in their Atlas of Imagined Places.

Yes. We've put together a public spreadsheet listing every location, with notes on why we chose the given location. Access it via Google Drive. Wait, you missed the home of that incidental character from Season 21, Episode 4 of Doctor Who. Please can you add it? I stumbled across this and I got so enthusiastic sending in ideas and suggestions of fictional places that he took me on as co-creator.

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Yes, we have. The master file of this map goes all the way out to the M25. It doesn't look the prettiest at the moment, because much of it is blank space, but we'd love to fill that in. Please do send us your best suggestions for Bromley, Sutton, Bexley, Havering and the rest, and we'll get mapping. Who helped? On the negative side, the art is kind of flat and not particularly interesting, and done in a color palette that I don't find particularly appealing. In places there repeating images that are so regular they must have been copy/pasted and the overall effect of some images is rather like wallpaper. Likewise, the imaginary places just aren't that interesting or exotic seeming. And I don't really think it is an "atlas", which to me implies maps. There is a map in the endpapers, but it feels more like an afterthought. In the beginning, there seems to be some effort to link the locations together, like taking a tour of the imaginary lands, and that is neat, but it is pretty much abandoned after the fifth location and they just skip around at random.

From Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot to the superhero land of Wakanda, from Lilliput of Gulliver's Travels to Springfield in The Simpsons, this is a wondrous atlas of imagined places around the world. Locations from film, tv, literature, myths, comics and video games are plotted in a series of beautiful vintage-looking maps. Perhaps the most densely populated map is London. Whole fictional boroughs such as Walford (Eastenders) and Canley (The Bill) are served by fictional tube stations such as Hobb's End (Quatermass and the Pit) and Vauxhall Cross (Die Another Day). A constellation of famous characters fill in the gaps. Spies James Bond, Alex Rider and George Smiley all inhabit the same cluster of Chelsea streets. Phileas Fogg could pop across the road into Grace Brothers, and dalmatians Pongo and Perdita could easily be spooked by the Invisible Man. From Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot to superhero Wakanda, from Lilliput of Gulliver's Travels to Springfield in The Simpsons, a wondrous atlas of imagined places around the world. Locations from film, tv, literature, myths, comics and video games are plotted in a series of beautiful vintage-looking maps. From the Ghostbusters HQ in New York to Nemo’s fish tank in Sydney, from the Phantom of the Opera’s Parisian lair to scenes from Grand Theft Auto in LA, this is an amazing atlas of imaginary locations in real-life cities around the world. Locations from film, TV, books, computer games and comics are ingeniously plotted on a series of beautiful vintage-looking maps.We're especially looking for locations outside of the centre. Whole swathes of Greater London, and much of Inner London are still empty. We're interested in central locations, too, but only the more mainstream additions will find room. The maps feature fictional buildings, towns, cities and countries plus mountains and rivers, oceans and seas. Ever wondered where the Bates Motel was based? Or Bedford Falls in It’s a Wonderful Life? The authors have taken years to research the likely geography of thousands of popular culture locations that have become almost real to us. Sometimes these are easy to work out, but other times a bit of detective work is needed and the authors have been those detectives. By looking at the maps, you’ll find that the revolution at Animal Farm happened next to Winnie the Pooh’s home.



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